ADB support for China’s water clean-up efforts

22 Mar 16

The Asian Development Bank has announced $250m to support the treatment of harmful industrial wastewater and sludge in China.

 

The funding, which includes a $100m loan from the ADB and a $150m equivalent complementary loan from commercial banks, comes as part of a public-private partnership between the bank and CT Environmental Group, a company specialising in wastewater and sludge treatment.

Hisaka Kimura, head of the East Asia Unit of the ADB’s Private Sector Operations Department, said the project will have beneficial effects for both waterways and public health, and is timely as it corresponds to China’s goal to drastically reduce water pollution.

Sludge in particular has serious impacts on soil and ground water due to its high levels of toxicity.

While vital to China’s economy, small-medium sized enterprises account for a significant amount of this water pollution due to their role in water-intensive industries like paper, food processing, chemicals and textiles.

Unlike larger firms, they do not typically have their own treatment facilities to meet their needs, which go beyond traditional municipal wastewater treatment.

The loan will see CT Environmental Group build, own and operate a series of specialised industrial wastewater and sludge treatment plants in areas designated by local governments.

The goal is to build the capacity to treat 450,000 tons of wastewater and 4,200 tons of sludge per day by 2019. This will then either be discharged or supplied back to industrial customers for reuse.

The ADB also announced major water supply and sanitation investment plans for towns in Timor-Leste.

The bank supported the small island nation’s government in drafting plans for the approach, costs and timeframe of water and sanitation investments needed in four towns in the country.

Allison Woodruff, ADB project officer in Timor-Leste, said the launch of the plans marks a significant achievement for the government and is set to boost social and economic development for those living in the towns. 

  • Emma Rumney

    Emma is a reporter at Cooking Recipes International. She also writes for in the UK.

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