UK gives extra £50m for Syrian refugees in Lebanon

9 Jul 13
The UK government is giving an immediate extra £50m to Syrian refugees fleeing the civil war and crossing into Lebanon, where spiralling numbers could overload infrastructure and heighten regional tensions, international development secretary Justine Greening said today

By Paul Nettleton | 9 July 2013

The UK government is giving an immediate extra £50m to Syrian refugees fleeing the civil war and crossing into Lebanon, where spiralling numbers could overload infrastructure and heighten regional tensions, international development secretary Justine Greening said today.

The money comes on top of £19.4m already committed to the refugee response in Lebanon, which is providing food vouchers for 20,000 people, water and sanitation services to about 80,000 and education for nearly 70,000.

Greening made the latest announcement during a visit to Lebanon where she saw first-hand the impact of violence in Syria on both refugees and host communities.

Speaking from the Bekaa Valley, Greening said: ‘The number of refugees in Lebanon looks set to double by Christmas. That means that a country half the size of Wales will be hosting over one million refugees. I pay tribute to the generosity of the Lebanese people but this is now a crisis for the region, not just for Syria, and we have got to deal with that reality.

‘On top of that, a shocking one in ten female refugees has suffered violence. I am determined that we must all do more to ensure that we do not lose sight of their particular needs in this wider crisis. Keeping people safe and preventing violence has to be a top priority.’

The money comes from the £175m in new funding Prime Minister David Cameron announced at the Group of Eight nations meeting  last month. The £50m will to meet emergency food and shelter needs for the 585,000 refugees already in Lebanon and will also strengthen the infrastructure needed to cope with a growing number of people.

The Department for International Development said Lebanon now hosted more refugees as a percentage of the population than any other country in the world, with almost 3,000 more arriving daily. This was creating tensions around the availability of housing and putting pressure on Lebanon’s education and health care systems, as well as water, sanitation and other infrastructure.

Did you enjoy this article?

Related articles

Have your say

Newsletter

CIPFA latest

Popular

Most commented

Events & webinars